Social and Cultural Responsibilities of the Graphic Designer
MA obtained at Istanbul Marmara University, Institute of Fine Arts, in 2005 
Tibor Kalman's infamous statement — 'designers, stay away from corporations that want you to lie for them', as designed for a billboard by Jonathan Barnbrook near the 1999 AIGA Las Vegas conference.
“Brand Baby,” courtesy of Adbusters magazine.

This thesis aims at the development of the disciplines by dealing with the social and cultural dimensions of graphic design products, debates the commercial feature of the discipline which is obstructed nowadays, tries to determine the aim and the function of graphic design in society and suggests that graphic designers must be more responsible for their production results.

The work starts with the trademarked new world section which deals with modernism and post-modernism which is also the development sequence of graphic design, in this section the new aspects of the world and especially its economic interaction with graphic design is under debated.

The second section which named as ethics in graphic design is the part that the basic comprehension of “decentness” in graphic design is questioned within the other evaluation appraisals and their manipulation in historic periods.

Published in 1964 by Ken Garland along with 20 other designers, photographers and students; the 'first things first' manifesto was a reaction to the 'hollow' advertising business and a call to the humanist aspect of graphic design.

In the third section named as “The social and cultural responsibilities of a graphic designer”, can be described by starting off the conclusions of exemplification which is formed by historical periods and examining the allocations and manifests which is manifested for finding the sense of graphic design again; and also deals with the diverse dimensions of the definition of graphic design and the role model designers which transforms this humanist point of view in their products are also examined.

Published in 1964 by Ken Garland along with 20 other designers, photographers and students; the 'first things first' manifesto was a reaction to the 'hollow' advertising business and a call to the humanist aspect of graphic design.